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A complicated kindness : a novel / Miriam Toews.

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  • 9 of 9 copies available at Bibliomation.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Bethel Public Library F TOEWS (Text to phone) 34030092376091 Adult Fiction Available -
Gunn Memorial Library - Washington FIC TOE (Text to phone) 34055101012890 Adult Fiction Available -
Kent Library Association - Kent F TOE (Text to phone) 33410000406746 Adult Fiction Available -
Mark Twain Library Association - Redding FIC Toe (Text to phone) 33620107838670 Adult Fiction Available -
Milford Public Library TOEWS Miriam (Text to phone) 34013076455693 Adult Fiction Available -
Norfolk Library FIC TOE (Text to phone) 36058010109680 Adult Fiction Available -
Plumb Memorial Library - Huntington Branch FIC TOE (Text to phone) 34025096023673 Adult Fiction Available -
Ridgefield Library FIC TOEWS (Text to phone) 34010100366656 Adult Fiction Available -
Southbury Public Library TOEWS (Text to phone) 34019101316214 Adult Fiction Available -

Record details

Genre: Domestic fiction.
Bildungsromans.

Syndetic Solutions - Excerpt for ISBN Number 1582433216
A Complicated Kindness
A Complicated Kindness
by Toews, Miriam
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Excerpt

A Complicated Kindness

One I live with my father, Ray Nickel, in that low brick bungalow out on highway number twelve. Blue shutters, brown door, one shattered window. Nothing great. The furniture keeps disappearing, though. That keeps things interesting. Half of our family, the better-looking half, is missing. Ray and I get up in the morning and move through our various activities until it's time to go to bed. Every single night around ten o'clock Ray tells me that he's hitting the hay. Along the way to his bedroom he'll stop in the front hallway and place notes on top of his shoes to remind him of the things he has to do the next day. We enjoy staring at the Northern Lights together. I told him, verbatim, what Mr. Quiring told us in class. About how those lights work. He thought Mr. Quiring had some interesting points. He's always been mildly interested in Mr. Quiring's opinions, probably because he's also a teacher. I have assignments to complete. That's the word, complete . I've got a problem with endings. Mr. Quiring has told me that essays and stories generally come, organically, to a preordained ending that is quite out of the writer's control. He says we will know it when it happens, the ending. I don't know about that. I feel that there are so many to choose from. I'm already anticipating failure. That much I've learned to do. But then what the hell will it matter to me while I'm snapping tiny necks and chucking feathery corpses onto a conveyor belt in a dimly lit cinder-block slaughterhouse on the edge of a town not of this world. Most of the kids from around here will end up working at Happy Family Farms, where local chickens go to meet their maker. I'm sixteen now, young to be on the verge of graduating from high school, and only months away from taking my place on the assembly line of death. One of my recurring memories of my mother, Trudie Nickel, has to do with the killing of fowl. She and I were standing in this farmyard watching Carson and his dad chop heads off chickens. You'd know Carson if you saw him. Carson Enns. Arm-farter in the back row. President of the Pervert Club. Says he's got a kid in Pansy, a small town south of here. Troubled boy, but that's no wonder considering he used to be The Snowmobile Suit Killer. I was eight and Trudie was about thirty-five. She was wearing a red wool coat and moon boots. The ends of her hair were frozen because she hadn't been able to find the blow-dryer that morning. Look, she'd said. She grabbed a strand of hair and bent it like a straw. She'd given me her paisley scarf to tie around my ears. I don't know exactly what we were doing at Carson's place in the midst of all that carnage, it hadn't started out that way I'm pretty sure, but I guess carnage has a way of creeping up on you. Carson was my age and every time he swung the axe he'd yell things at the chicken. He wanted it to escape. Run, you stupid chicken! Carson, his dad would say. Just his name and a slight anal shake of the head. He was doing his best to nurture the killer in his son. It was around 4:30 in the afternoon on a winter day and the light was fading into blue and it was snowing horizontally and we were all standing under a huge yellow yard light. Well, some of us were dying. And Carson was doing this awful botch job on a chicken, hacking away at its neck, not doing it right at all, whispering instructions on how to escape. Fly away, idiot. Don't make me do this. Poor kid. By this time he'd unzipped the top half of his snowmobile suit so it kind of flapped around his waist like a skirt, slowing him down, and his dad saw him and came over and grabbed the semi-mutilated chicken out of Carson's little mittened hand and slapped it onto this wooden altar thing he used to do the killing and brought his axe down with incredible speed and accuracy and in less than a second had created a splattery painting in the snow and I was blown away by how the blood could land so fast and without a single sound and my mom gasped and said look, Nomi, it's a Jackson Pollock. Oh, it's beautiful. Oh, she said, cloths of heaven. That was something she said a lot. And Carson and I stood there staring at the blood on the snow and my mom said: Just like that. Who knew it could be so easy. I don't know if she meant it's so easy to make art or it's so easy to kill a chicken or it's so easy to die. Every single one of those things strikes me as being difficult to do. I imagine that if she were here right now and I was asking her what she meant, she'd say what are you talking about and I'd say nothing and that would be the end of it. It's only because she's gone that all those trivial little things from the past echo on and on and on. At dinner that night, after the slaughter at Carson's place, she asked us how we would feel if for some reason we were all in comas and had slept right through the summer months and had woken up around the middle of November, would we be angry that we had missed the warmth and beauty of the summer or happy that we had survived. Ray, who hates choosing, had asked her if we couldn't be both and she'd said no, she didn't think so. Trudie doesn't live here any more. She left shortly after Tash, my older sister, left. Ray and I don't know where either one of them is. We do know that Tash left with Ian, who is Mr. Quiring's nephew. He's double-jointed and has a red Ford Econoline van. Trudie seems to have left alone. Now my dad, you know what he says in the middle of those long evenings sitting in our house on the highway? He says: Say, Nomi, how about spinning a platter. Yeah, he uses those exact butt-clenching words. Which means he wants to listen to Anne Murray singing "Snowbird," again. Or my old Terry Jacks forty-five of "Seasons in the Sun." I used to play that song over and over in the dark when I was nine, the year I really became aware of my existence. What a riot. We have a ball. Recently, Ray's been using the word stomach as a verb a lot. And also the word rally . We rally and we stomach. Ray denied it when I pointed it out to him. He says we're having a good time and getting by. Why shouldn't he amend? He tells me that life is filled with promise but I think he means the promise of an ending because so far I haven't been able to put my finger on any other. If we could get out of this town things might be better but we can't because we're waiting for Trudie and Tash to come back. It's been three years so far. My period started the day after Trudie left which means I've bled thirty-six times since they've been gone. Excerpted from A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toews All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
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