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Crescent [CD sound recording] / Diana Abu-Jaber.

Abu-Jaber, Diana. (Author). Doukas, Nike. (Added Author). Tubert, Marcelo. (Added Author).

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  • 1 of 1 copy available at Bibliomation.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Deep River Public Library BCD F Abu (Text to phone) 3603900055038% Adult Fiction CD Available -

Record details

Content descriptions

General Note: Compact discs.
Abridged.
Participant or Performer Note: Read by Nike Doukas with Marcelo Tubert.
Subject: Arab American women Fiction
Cookery, Lebanese Fiction
College teachers Fiction
Arab Americans Fiction
Women cooks Fiction
Restaurants Fiction
Los Angeles (Calif.) Fiction
Genre: Love stories.

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for UPC Number 025024892288
Crescent
Crescent
by Abu-Jaber, Diana; Tubert, Marcelo (Read by); Doukas, Nike (Read by)
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BookList Review

Crescent

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

Sirine's now-deceased missionary parents were Iraqi and American; she's been raised since she was nine by her beloved Iraqi uncle. Her world is his house, the cafewhere she is chef, and the air of Los Angeles. She's nearly 40, and inside her pale skin and green eyes she feels the rhythms of her uncle's Arabic stories and the scent of Eastern spices. Hanif ("Han"), a professor of Arabic literature at the local university, comes to the cafefor the tastes of home, and he and Sirine fall into an affair of wild, sweet tenderness. After 20 years away, Han is driven, despite Saddam, to return to Iraq to see if anything is left of his family. Sirine is devastated and feels responsible. Each chapter begins with an installment of a fantastical family story told by Sirine's uncle; the rest of the novel is written in the present tense. Abu-Jaber's language is miraculous, whether describing the texture of Han's skin or Sirine's way with an onion. It is not possible to stop reading. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido

Syndetic Solutions - Library Journal Review for UPC Number 025024892288
Crescent
Crescent
by Abu-Jaber, Diana; Tubert, Marcelo (Read by); Doukas, Nike (Read by)
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Library Journal Review

Crescent

Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

In this follow-up to Abu-Jaber's justly praised debut, Arabian Jazz, spinsterish Sirine lives to cook until a charming Arabic literature professor shows up in her restaurant. Big foreign sales. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for UPC Number 025024892288
Crescent
Crescent
by Abu-Jaber, Diana; Tubert, Marcelo (Read by); Doukas, Nike (Read by)
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Publishers Weekly Review

Crescent

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Abu-Jaber (Arabian Jazz) weaves the story of a love affair between a comely chef and a handsome, haunted Near Eastern Studies professor together with a fanciful tale of a mother's quest to find her wayward son in this beautifully imagined and timely novel, which explores private emotions and global politics with both grace and conviction. Green-eyed, 39-year-old Sirine cooks up Arab specialties in a bustling cafe in Los Angeles where Arab students gather for a taste of home. When her doting uncle, who raised her after the death of her relief-worker parents 30 years ago, introduces her to his colleague Hanif, the placid surface of her life is disturbed. Their affair begins quickly and ardently, as Sirine, who has heretofore equated cooking with love, discovers the pleasures of romance, and the exiled Han struggles to feel grounded in a place far from the Baghdad he loved as a boy. In Abu-Jaber's sensuous prose, the city is as lush and fragrant as the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, and her secondary characters, like the wry, wise cafe owner Um-Nadia and the charmingly narcissistic poet and satyr Aziz, are appealingly eccentric. But a darkly troubled photographer drawn to both Sirine and Han, news of Saddam Hussein's latest atrocities and Han's painful memories of his imprisoned brother and his disappeared sister, for whose fates he feels responsible, cloud their affair, perhaps dooming it. Abu-Jaber's poignant contemplations of exile and her celebration of Sirine's exotic, committed domesticity-almond cookies, cardamom, and black tea with mint-help make this novel feel as exquisite as the "flaming, blooming" mejnoona tree behind Nadia's Cafe. Agent, Joy Harris. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Search Results Showing Item 5 of 11

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