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Search Results Showing Item 6 of 134

It's not easy being bad / by Cynthia Voigt.

Voigt, Cynthia. (Author).

Available copies

  • 6 of 6 copies available at Bibliomation.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Ansonia Public Library YA VOIGT, CYNTHIA PBK (Text to phone) 34045105779065 Young Adult Fiction Available -
Chester Public Library J VOI (Text to phone) 33210000370607 Juvenile Fiction Available -
Gunn Memorial Library - Washington YA FIC VOI (Text to phone) 34055102344284 Young Adult Fiction Available -
Killingly Library YA/F Voi (Text to phone) 34040101965107 Young Adult Fiction Available -
Salem Free Public Library Y FIC VOI (Text to phone) 33640121264794 Young Adult Fiction Available -
Willimantic Public Library Y VOI (Text to phone) 34036127080244 Windham Heights Learning Center Available -

Record details

Content descriptions

General Note: "An Anne Schwartz book"
Summary, etc.: Two unpopular girls try to break into the seventh grade clique system, even though they're not really sure they want to be popular at all.
Subject: Popularity Fiction
Schools Fiction
Individuality Fiction
Friendship Fiction

Syndetic Solutions - Publishers Weekly Review for ISBN Number 0689851154
It's Not Easy Being Bad
It's Not Easy Being Bad
by Voigt, Cynthia
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Publishers Weekly Review

It's Not Easy Being Bad

Publishers Weekly


(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

In the third novel about Mikey and Margalo, heroines of Bad Girls and Bad, Badder, Baddest, Newbery Medalist Voigt demonstrates that, indeed, it's not easy being bad: Mikey and Margalo, now in junior high, are working overtime at their schemes and plots and machinations. Unfortunately, Voigt seems to be having difficulty, too: despite many scathingly witty moments and sharp insights here, elements of the story feel trumped up. Previously unfettered by their peers' opinions, Mikey and Margalo are forced to reconsider their maverick behavior when they enter the brave new world of seventh grade. As Margalo puts it, "It's not really being popular I want. I just want not to be unpopular." But when Mikey's ill-considered plan to ingratiate herself with the popular crowd backfires, both girls are out for revenge. A sample: Margalo takes to heartily greeting Rhonda, a ringleader of the popular girls, by calling her "Barbie"; when Rhonda is flirting with an eighth-grade boy, Margalo humiliates her with, "And I see you brought Ken to school with you today." Voigt, however, starts striking false notes. Margalo, for example, is now billed as clever at fashion, able to assemble fantastic looks from thrift-store shopping, but the author lacks the girly-girl enthusiasm of, say, a Phyllis Reynolds Naylor or a Caroline Cooney to credibly integrate Margalo's sudden stylishness into the story line. Readers will know the attention to clothes is akin to a gun in Act One of a play, and sure enough, Margalo's prize thrift-store purchase turns out to be a popular girl's mom's discard. While more intelligent than most similarly themed middle-grade fiction, this Mikey and Margalo installment doesn't stand up to its predecessors. Ages 9-13. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Syndetic Solutions - BookList Review for ISBN Number 0689851154
It's Not Easy Being Bad
It's Not Easy Being Bad
by Voigt, Cynthia
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BookList Review

It's Not Easy Being Bad

Booklist


From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.

Gr. 5Bad Girls, 1996, and Bad, Badder, Baddest, 1997) are back and just as obstreperous as ever. The seventh-graders are now dealing with popularity--and the painful fact that they have none. Determined to be accepted in the strict social structure of middle school, the girls come up with various plans for getting in with the "in crowd," most of which fail miserably. The cruelty of middle-school cliques comes to life with hilarious and sometimes humiliating verisimilitude. As usual, Voigt creates real characters, with lovable traits and exasperating habits. There are no real monsters here, even among the popular girls, but this is still an on-target portrait of a segment of middle-school society, with marvelous Mikey and Margalo at the center. Expect a run on this title from seventh-grade girls. --Debbie Carton

Syndetic Solutions - School Library Journal Review for ISBN Number 0689851154
It's Not Easy Being Bad
It's Not Easy Being Bad
by Voigt, Cynthia
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School Library Journal Review

It's Not Easy Being Bad

School Library Journal


(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 4-7-Mikey and Margalo are back and enduring the daily challenges of junior high. This third title in the series is very similar to the others, and while it reads fairly well on its own, there are some details that may confuse readers who are unfamiliar with the earlier books. Now in seventh grade, the best friends still vacillate between desperately wanting to be popular and relishing their status as outcasts. They alternate between competing with and comforting one another. Major traumas include Mikey's sneaky campaign to be allowed to play on the eighth-grade tennis team, and Margalo's shame at being discovered as a thrift-store shopper. While Voigt successfully captures the nature of being a female adolescent, Mikey and Margalo are so spiteful and manipulative that it's hard to really care about or truly root for them. This is a quick but fairly empty read, to be added only where Bad Girls (1996) and Bad, Badder, Baddest (1997, both Scholastic) have a following.-Ronni Krasnow, formerly at Arlington County Public Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Search Results Showing Item 6 of 134

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